4 Reasons I’m Still Using Exercise.com in 2021

Although it’s not the system it was when I started, Exercise.com still plays a role in my weight loss journey. I’m still hoping that one day, they’ll bring back the social challenge aspect. But until then, there are still a few reasons why it remains on my phone.

And, I am still on the lookout for something similar that does have challenge capabilities. Because there’s nothing wrong with a bit of friendly competition when it comes to fitness.

How I’m Using Exercise.com to Guide My Fitness Routines

I’ve been using Exercise.com since it was called WeightTraining.com. And back then, it had a really fun challenge platform that I engaged others in all the time.

But after the move, they got rid of that feature because, and I quote, “nobody was using it.” My groups and I were, on a weekly basis!

Anyway, I still find the site semi-useful. Especially given some of the other things it offers. And I have yet to find anything to come close to what I’m looking for overall.

So, how do I use Exercise.com and its app to track fitness progress?

1. Improving Overall Site Ranking

I like competing. Even though I can’t challenge people directly, the site still monitors points and displays an overall rank. At the time I am writing this, I am at #572.

This is all based on the amount of points I make during certain exercises. For instance, playing with the Bodyblade for just under 23 minutes netted 37 points to count towards my total rank.

It’s one of my goals to be in the top 100 of the website. After the recent account purge on Exercise.com, my position improved by almost a thousand. So, I am guessing I don’t have a lot of competition today.

2. Competing with Site Averages

Anytime someone using Exercise.com records a workout, it shows on the specific exercise. This page will break down the average reps per set as well as the maximum.

So, even though I can’t compete directly with someone, I can still pit my abilities against the sitewide performance each month.

For instance, right now, the sitewide average for a push-up is 14 reps with the best being 51. I doubt I could do 51, but I could possibly surpass the site average.

3. Keeping Track of Personal Records

I’m a big fan of breaking personal records to motivate me to continue. Unfortunately, the recent database purge also wiped the slate clean for those records.

This means that I have to set new personal bests. And I really wanted to break some of those records I set back in 2014.

At any rate, using Exercise.com in this fashion lets me keep all of the workout information in one location without having spreadsheets all over the place.

Plus, it’s kind of cool to see how my performance stacks up against other people using the website. On the left, you see your rank in reference to active site users.

Right now, it’s easy to get the #1 position if you do exercises that no one else adds to their workout routines.

4. Looking Up How to Do Certain Exercises

Lastly, the website has thousands of exercises accompanied by videos on how to perform them. Most of which are created by experts in fitness.

You can look up exercises by muscle group, difficulty, type, what equipment you’ll use, and more. You can even lookup exercises related to specific sports if you plan on doing some focused training.

This is how I’ve found a lot of my favorites to create custom workouts.

What About Joining Groups?

When you joined a group while using Exercise.com before, it would show a leaderboard of people who performed specific exercises for that group. There were also a lot of people active and messaging each other.

Today, though, it seems all the groups I’m interested in are a bit on the quiet side. For example, there isn’t a single bit of activity in the RunKeeper group as of this post.

The group also takes an incredibly long time to load, especially since it returns with no data or activity.

So, the site is definitely a shadow of its former self. It definitely lost a lot of interaction and activity once the site was rebranded and redesigned.

Even among all of this, though, I still find a bit of value with the platform.

Exercise.com is More Active on Social Media

Oddly enough, the social media account of the site is more active than it used to be. Especially on Twitter. So, why not put that same effort into maintaining the website?

To be honest, I think using Exercise.com is going to be a thing of the past. The interest in what they created just isn’t as profound as it used to be.

This is a perfect example of trying to fix things that are not broken. Always survey your audience before you strip down features that everyone clearly wanted.

Experimenting with Other Apps

In 2021, I am looking for other apps of interest. Don’t get me wrong, I like using Exercise.com, and it’s been extremely helpful over the years. But, as I said before, I am a fan of the social engagement factor.

Besides, trying out a few apps over the next couple of months will give me a few new blog posts to write.

There have been several that piqued my interest recently. And I’m even tempted to play Pokemon Go just so I can get some steps with my kids.

But in the end, I’m looking for something that works on a point system that pits you against other users with direct challenges.

It’s one of the biggest reasons why I join every Fitbit challenge that comes my way. Sure, I don’t get in nearly the amount of steps as some of my friends. But the social interaction, chatting, and competition drive me.

If you have a better fitness tracker that has a social competitive edge, feel free to let me know in the comment section.

Do You Monitor Your Progress?

In reality, any system that helps you keep track of personal progress is ideal. It all really comes down to what you get out of it and if it helps you stay focused.

This is why I continue using Exercise.com throughout 2021. It works well for what I want…it’s just missing that one vital component.

Even if you set up a simple spreadsheet, if that’s what works to motivate you, then it’s all you really need.

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Michael Brockbank

Since 2015, Michael has put in the effort to lose more than 80 pounds by gamifying fitness and eating proper portion sizes. He conducts extensive research into various health and fitness products to provide the best answers possible according to his own experience and knowledge.

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