Fitness in Theory – Episode 4: Food Neutrality

In today’s episode, Sam and I go over the details of food neutrality. And although I get a bit worked up according to some details, I can concede that the mindset could help people have a healthier relationship with food. It’s just something I would never consider.

What Set Me Off for Food Neutrality?

I usually try to keep an open mind when tackling a subject. But this time, there was simply too much negative connotation behind the term, “food neutrality.” Most of the articles I read were full of misinformation and new-age beliefs that had no real substance in science.

For instance, one “dietician” stated that there were no “healthy or unhealthy” foods. According to science and a slew of personal evidence, this statement is absurd.

Then you have the fact that someone from Mondelez International was pushing this agenda. If you’re unaware, Mondelez International governs over a wide assortment of “junk foods.”

it would be like if the Marlboro Man promoted cigarette smoking as a way to…oh…right.

In this episode, Sam and I take a bit of an opposite stance on the understanding of food neutrality. Mostly, it centers around the term “bad” and how there are no bad foods.

To me, bad food is simply an oversimplification of labeling something you know that is not going to benefit your diet plans or ideas of health and fitness.

Is Being Neutral Toward Food Right for You?

Some people probably need that mental image of not calling food bad. But I stand by what I said that if calling something bad is triggering, then you should probably seek some kind of therapy.

That’s not to be rude, but a lot of food-related mental issues can benefit from a licensed therapist. There have been times when I considered seeking professional help as a stress eater.

In any case, what are your feelings about food neutrality? Is it something you try to practice in your home?

(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)

About Author

Michael Brockbank

Since 2015, Michael has put in the effort to lose more than 80 pounds by gamifying fitness and eating proper portion sizes. He conducts extensive research into various health and fitness products to provide the best answers possible according to his own experience and knowledge.

Let me know what you think...

%d bloggers like this: